search for




 

Effect of Virtual Reality Inspiratory Muscle Training on Diaphragm Movement and Respiratory Function in Female Patients with Thoracic Restriction
J Korean Soc Phys Med 2019;14(1):101-110
Published online February 28, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.13066/kspm.2019.14.1.101
© 2019 Korean Society of Physical Medicine.

Myung-Soo Jang⋅Sung-Dae Choung⋅Jae-Hoon Shim⋅Seong-Tae Hong1†

Department of Physical Therapy, Baekseok University
1Department of Industrial Engineering, General Graduate School of Dankook University
Received November 13, 2018; Revised November 19, 2018; Accepted December 12, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study was conducted to analyze the effects of virtual reality inspiratory muscle training and conventional inspiratory muscle training on diaphragm movement and pulmonary function in patients with thoracic restriction.
METHODS: This study measured diaphragm movement, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and thoracic mobility (upper, middle, and lower trunk) under two different conditions. Forty young women between 19 and 24 years of age who had no history of orthopedic symptoms for the last 6 months were divided into experimental and control groups. The experimental group performed virtual reality inspiratory muscle training and diaphragm breathing, and the control group performed conventional inspiratory muscle training and diaphragm breathing.
RESULTS: The control group showed a significant increase in all dependent variables except for lower trunk mobility and PEF. The experimental group showed a significant increase in all dependent variables except for lower trunk mobility. Particularly, the experimental group showed significant increases in diaphragm movement (p<.05), FVC (p<.05), FEV1 (p<.05), and PEF (p<.05) relative to the control group.
CONCLUSION: We recommend inspiratory muscle training with a virtual reality program over conventional training to improve diaphragm movement and pulmonary function in patients with thoracic restriction.
Keywords : Diaphragm movement, Inspiratory muscle training, Pulmonary function, Virtual reality


February 2019, 14 (1)
Full Text(PDF) Free

Social Network Service
Services

Cited By Articles
  • CrossRef (0)