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Effect of Action Observation by Subject Type on the Balance and the Gait of Stroke Patients
J Korean Soc Phys Med 2019;14(1):7-14
Published online February 28, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.13066/kspm.2019.14.1.7
© 2019 Korean Society of Physical Medicine.

Jong-Su Lee, PT, MS⋅Kyoung Kim, PT, PhD1† ⋅Young-Mi Kim, PT, PhD2

Department of Rehabilitation Science, Graduate School, Daegu University
1,2Department of Rehabilitation Science, Graduate School, Daegu University
Received September 18, 2018; Revised September 21, 2018; Accepted October 22, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study examined the effects of observing a self-video or a video of another person performing balance and gait training, followed by actual performance of the observed movements on the balance and walking ability of chronic stroke patients.
METHODS: Thirty patients, who had experienced a stroke and were admitted to S rehabilitation hospital for treatment, were selected randomly and divided into three groups with 10 patients each: self-action observation (SAO) group, other-action observation (OAO) group, and treadmill walking training (TWT) group. The training program was conducted five times per week for four weeks. The GAITRite system, 10 m walking test, and timed up and go test were performed to measure the subjects’ gait and balance ability.
RESULTS: The velocity, cadence, double support, and stride length were increased significantly in the SAO and OAO groups (p<.05) but the T group showed no significant changes; no significant difference was observed among the groups (p >.05). The 10MWT decreased significantly in the OAO group (p<.05), but there were no significant changes in the SAO and T groups, and no significant difference was observed among the groups (p>.05). The TUG decreased significantly in the SAO and OAO groups (p<.05), but there were no significant changes in the T group, and no significant difference was observed among the groups (p>.05).
CONCLUSION: The self or other action observation training helps improve the balance and gait ability.
Keywords : Gait, Postural balance, Stroke


February 2019, 14 (1)
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