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Effect of Carrying Weight on the Gait of Elderly Women when using a Walking Assistant Vehicle
J korean soc phys med 2018;13(4):1-8
Published online November 30, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.13066/kspm.2018.13.4.1
© 2018 Korean Society of Physical Medicine.

Hyo-Lyun Roh, PT, PhD⋅Sung-Min Son, OT, MS1⋅Sung-Won Kwag, OT, MS1†

Department of Physical Therapy, Kangwon National University
1Department of Emergency Medical Service Rehabilitation, Kangwon National University Graduate School
Received June 15, 2018; Revised June 18, 2018; Accepted August 6, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study was conducted to analyze the effects of carrying weight on the gait of elderly women using a walking-assistant vehicle (WAV) as the weight increased.
METHODS: A total of 30 elderly women living in the local community were included as subjects and instructed to walk 50 m using a WAV loaded with sandbags corresponding to 0%, 5%, 10%, or 15% of their mean weight. The subjects’ gait was analyzed using a gait analyzer to measure stride length, step length, step width, and gait time.
RESULTS: Stride and step lengths were longest when carrying 5% of their weight and shortest when carrying 15% of their mean body weight. Step width and gait time were lowest when carrying weights corresponding to 5% and highest for 15% of their mean body weight. When observing gait with a WAV, the gait time was greatly affected by weights, with carrying weight equivalent to 5% of the body weight positively affected the gait with a WAV, whereas carrying weights of >15% resulted in slower gait speed.
CONCLUSION: When walking with a WAV, an appropriate carrying weight of approximately 5% of the body weight stabilizes gait, while a weight of 15% leads decreased gait efficiency. Therefore, when using a WAV during outdoor activities, elderly women should add some weight to the WAV; however, the carrying weight should be <15% of the body weight.
Keywords : Elderly women, Gait, Walking assistant


November 2018, 13 (4)
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